“Ho Mang Hang’s Collection of Historiographic Materials Concerning Wang Jingwei”: A legacy

編輯 EditorAbout the books, Announcements

Ho Mang Hang and Wang Jingwei

In keeping with its mission, The Wang Jingwei Irrevocable Trust is pleased to announce its donation of the Ho Mang Hang (1916-2016) collection of archival and research materials to Columbia University’s C.V. Starr East Asian Library. Many of the items in the collection have been published in the 2019 series Wang Jingwei & Modern China and will continue to be revealed … Read More

Wang Poetry as Gifts of Friendship and Affection

編輯 EditorFrom the Editor

Wang Jingwei’s Shuangzhaolou poem inscribed by 盧子樞 Lu Zishu (1900-1978) on folding fan painted by 溥儒 Pu Ru (1896-1963).Wang Jingwei’s poetry was often used as inscriptions in the creation of folding fans, which were carriers of painting and calligraphy. Folding fans were gifts of friendship and affection among the literati. In 1930, Wang inscribed his poem on a fan painted by 陳樹人 … Read More

Ho Mang Hang and Hong Kong

編輯 EditorAbout the books

On July 1, 1997 when Hong Kong was handed over to China, the Hong Kong flag1 , featuring 洋紫荊, Bauhinia blakeana2 in the design flew for the first time. Ho Mang Hang was working as the laboratory superintendent3 in the botany department at Hong Kong University in Pokfulam when Bauhinia blakeana was designated the city’s emblem in 1965. The plant was first … Read More

Love in Poetry: Wang Jingwei and Chen Bijun

編輯 EditorAbout the books

Wang Jingwei’s calligraphy of a poem he dedicated to his wife, Chen Bijun. (Wang Jingwei Poetry – Newly Edited, p. 2) In Shuangzhaoloushici duhouji (“Reflections After Reading Shuangzhaolou Poetry”), (Wang Jingwei Poetry – Newly Edited, p. 2) Ho Mang Hang made the following observation about the relationship between Wang Jingwei and Chen Bijun:Wang’s use of “Shuangzhao” to name his poetry collection illustrates how … Read More

Reading and Writing—Life Behind Bars for Wang Jingwei and Associates

編輯 EditorAbout the books

In the handwritten draft of his autobiography, Wang Jingwei described how he endured prison life by writing poetry, which was later collected in Shuangzhaolou shicigao. Wang Jingwei Nanshe Poetry (page 76)The Book of Odes says: “The common people have toiled long and may well be allowed a little rest.” How true this is. To work and toil belongs inevitably to our … Read More